Archives for posts with tag: Music

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Selected quotations sourced from AllAboutJazz.com

Bold indicates Daily FYI Editor’s Choice

“I was unfashionable before anyone knew who I was.”

“I think I had it in the back of my mind that I wanted to sound like a dry martini.”

On the secret of his tone: “I honestly don’t know! It has something to do with the fact that I play illegally.”

He was an English major in college. His reason for not pursuing a literary career, “I could only write at the beach, and I kept getting sand in my typewriter.”

Of writer Jack Kerouac he said, “I hate the way he writes. I kind of love the way he lives, though.”

Of Vogue fashion models, he said, “Sometimes they go around with guys who are scuffling — for a while. But usually they end up marrying some cat with a factory. This is the way the world ends, not with a whim but a banker.”

“Sometimes I get the feeling that there are orgies going on all over new York City, and somebody says, `Let’s call Desmond,’ and somebody else says, ‘Why bother? He’s probably home reading the Encyclopedia Britannica.'” 

Shortly before the Dave Brubeck Quartet disbanded, “We’re working as if it were going out of style — which of course it is.”

Of contact lenses: “Not for me. If I want to tune everybody out, I just take off my glasses and enjoy the haze”

His response to the annoying banality of an interviewer, “You’re beginning to sound like a cross between David Frost and David Susskind, and that is a cross I cannot bear.”

Desmond’s fondness for scotch was well known. So in early 1976 when a physical examination showed lung cancer, he was ironically pleased that his liver was fine. “Pristine, perfect. One of the great livers of our time. Awash in Dewars and full of health.”

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There is a statue of the Fab 4 on the mountain Kök Töbe (translation: Green Hill) outside of Almaty, Kazakhstan. 

John Hartford and the Dillards on Austin City Limits doing Orange Blossom Special in 1978.

John Cowan Hartford (December 30, 1937 – June 4, 2001) was an American folk, country and bluegrass composer and musician known for his mastery of the fiddle and banjo, as well as for his witty lyrics, unique vocal style, and extensive knowledge of Mississippi River lore. Hartford performed with a variety of ensembles throughout his career, and is perhaps best known for his solo performances where he would interchange the guitar, banjo, and fiddle from song to song. He also invented his own shuffle tap dance move, and clogged on an amplified piece of plywood while he played and sang.

The Dillards are an American bluegrass band from Salem, Missouri. The Dillards originally consisted of Douglas Flint “Doug” Dillard (born March 6, 1937, Salem, Missouri – May 16, 2012) on banjo, Rodney Adean “Rod” Dillard (born May 18, 1942, Salem, Missouri) playing the guitar, and dobro, Roy ‘Dean’ Webb (born March 28, 1937, Independence, Missouri) on mandolin, and Mitchell Franklin “Mitch” Jayne (July 5, 1928, Hammond, Indiana – August 2, 2010) on double bass.

The fiddle tune “Orange Blossom Special,” about the passenger train of the same name, was written by Ervin T. Rouse (1917-1981) in 1938. The original recording was created by Ervin and Gordon Rouse in 1939. It is often called simply The Special. It has been referred to as the fiddle player’s national anthem.

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Standin’ on the Corner Park in Winslow, Arizona is a publicly operated park, commemorating the Eagles-Jackson Browne song “Take It Easy”. The park contains a two-story trompe-l’œil mural by John Pugh, and a life-size bronze statue of a man standing on a corner, with a guitar. The park is surrounded a wall of bricks, each with a donor’s name on it, and a story by each of the donors describing their fondness for Winslow. The park was opened in 1999. 

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Moondog, born Louis Thomas Hardin (May 26, 1916 – September 8, 1999), was a blind American composer, musician, poet and inventor of several musical instruments. Moving to New York as a young man, Moondog made a deliberate decision to make his home on the streets there, where he spent approximately twenty of the thirty years he lived in the city. Most days he could be found in his chosen part of town wearing clothes he had created based on his own interpretation of the Norse god Odin. Thanks to his unconventional outfits and lifestyle, he was known for much of his life as “The Viking of 6th Avenue”.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moondog

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/moondog-mn0000496525

Originally by Patty and the Emblems. Written by the great Leon Huff and Ralston McGriff.

Freddy Fender (June 4, 1937 – October 14, 2006), born Baldemar Garza Huerta in San Benito, TexasUnited States, was a Mexican-AmericanTejanocountry and rock and roll musician, known for his work as a solo artist and in the groups Los Super Seven and the Texas Tornados. He is best known for his 1975 hits “Before the Next Teardrop Falls” and the subsequent remake of his own “Wasted Days and Wasted Nights“.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freddy_Fender